calcium score screening in Morristown, NJ

Calcium score screening is a non-invasive and safe way of detecting the presence of calcium deposits in the coronary arteries before they become symptomatic and lead to heart attacks.

The calcium score is a measure of how much plaque has built up in the arteries. Plaque is made up of cholesterol, fat, and other materials. When plaque builds up in the arteries, it can reduce the amount of blood that flows to the heart. This can lead to chest pain, heart attack, and other problems.

The calcium score is an X-ray test that can detect microscopic amounts of calcified plaque buildup in your arteries. It helps predict whether you’re likely to have a heart attack or stroke within three years.

Calcium score screening in Morristown, NJ is a non-invasive and safe way of detecting the presence of calcium deposits in the coronary arteries before they become symptomatic and lead to heart attacks. The results from your cardiovascular disease risk assessment can be used along with these findings, as well as your personal history, family history, lifestyle choices and risk factors, to help your doctor decide whether to recommend further testing or treatment.

Calcium scores are not the same as coronary artery calcium (CAC) tests, which use computed tomography (CT) scans to take 3-D images of your heart and measure the amount of calcified plaque present in your arteries. A high level suggests you have a greater risk for developing heart disease. Doctors typically only order CAC tests when they suspect someone has Coronary Artery Disease because of their family history or increased risks due to other illnesses such as diabetes or high blood pressure.

calcium score screening in Morristown, NJ

Calcium score screening is used mainly for men over 45 years old who aren’t at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, but it’s also used to screen women with appropriate risk factors.

Calcium scores and CAC tests are not intended to take the place of a standard diagnostic workup for cardiovascular disease. The American Heart Association recommends that if you’re diagnosed with coronary artery calcium, you should also have an exercise treadmill test or nuclear stress test to help determine your risk for heart disease .

The calcium score is based on the average amount of calcified plaque found in people who don’t display symptoms of heart disease, but research suggests it may be able to predict future problems even among those without known risks. If people do score high, they typically need to undertake more comprehensive testing and treatment plans.